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Taylor, Mildred D.
THE LAND
New York : P. Fogelman 2001.
IL 5-8, RL 8.9
ISBN 0803719507

(3 booktalks)

Booktalk #1

Paul Logan does not have an easy life.  Born a slave, he doesn't really remember those days.  His mother was a slave before the war.  And his father was the slave owner.  It was quite common in those days for the slave owners to have children by the slaves.  It was known but not spoken of.  But Paul Logan's father was different.  He acknowledged Paul and his sister Cassie as his.  Paul's mother had stayed on at the plantation even after being freed.  Some say that Paul's black mother and his white father really loved each other.  Of course, things being the way they were, they could never marry or live together openly --- even after his father's white wife died.  That's just the way things were.  Paul was welcomed into the home of his father for meals and such but he lived with his mother in a small house nearby.  Paul was educated and thought he was treated just like his white brothers.  As he grew into his teenage years, he came to the realization that he could never be truly equal to his white brothers. He would always be his daddy's colored son.   His father also came to understand that maybe he needed to let Paul know what it meant to be black.  Even though Paul was so light he was often mistaken for white, he knew that he was black.  He would have to learn the hard way about the difference between black and white.  Through all his struggles, he had one goal in mind -- to own his own land.  This was not a realistic goal for a black man in the south during the Reconstruction, but Paul held onto his goal through it all.  Fans of Taylor's Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry  will enjoy this prequel to the novel.  Meet Cassie's grandparents and find out where it all began.

Booktalk #2

    Paul Logan does not have an easy life.  His mother was a slave before the war and his father was the slave owner.   It was quite common in those days for the slave owners to have children by the slaves.  Although it was known, people did not talk about it.   Almost all children born of mixed races were not recognized by their white parent.  However, Paul Logan's father was different.  He acknowledged Paul and his sister Cassie as his.
                        After the Civil War and gaining her freedom, Paul's mother stayed on at the plantation.  Some say that Paul's black mother and his white father really loved each other.  Because of peopleís beliefs and societyís rules they could never marry or live together openly - even after his father's white wife died.  That's just the way things were.
                        Paul and Cassie were welcomed into the home of their father for meals and activities but, they lived with their mother in a small house nearby.  Both were educated and Paul had always thought that they were treated just like their white brothers. Early in his teen years, Paul came to the realization that he could never be truly equal to his white brothers.  He would always be his daddy's colored son.   His father also came to understand that maybe he had made a mistake in Paulís upbringing and that he needed to let Paul know what it meant to be black.
                        Even though Paul was often mistaken for white due to his light skin, he knew that he was black.  Throughout his teen and young adult years he learns the hard way about the difference between black and white.   Paul faces many hardships and struggles, yet foremost in his mind is his goal - to own his own land.  This was not a realistic goal for a black man in the Reconstruction years, but Paul held onto his goal through it all.

                    Prequel to the novel Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry.   Read Paulís story and find out where it all began.  (Rebecca P. Hopper, hopper_gfc@chester.k12.sc.us,
Media Specialist, Great Falls Middle School, Great Falls, SC)

Booktalk #3

"The Land" by Mildred D. Taylor was a very good book. If you have read any other books by this author, then you know that she is very good at depicting life before African Americans were considered equal. In this particular book, the life of Paul Edward Logan is followed from his childhood to adulthood. Paul Edward was the son of a white man and a Native American woman. As you know,  way back when, children of slave were thought of as illegitimate. Besides Paul Edward, Edward Logan had another child named Cassie. This was Paul's big sister.
                    In the book, it basically describes the life of Paul Edward growing up and overcoming obstacles in his life. If you like historical fiction, holla @ this book.  (Nadia Smith, nadiahcms2009@yahoo.com, Hertford County Middle School Library)

SUBJECTS:     Racially mixed people -- Fiction.
                        African Americans -- Fiction.
                        Prejudices -- Fiction.
                        Race relations -- Fiction.
                        Southern States -- Fiction.

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